The Rotary Jaipur Limb project is a pro-active fund-raising and project-initiating body of Rotarians, drawn from all over RIBI (the Rotary International region covering Britain and Ireland). It was formed in 1985 and became a registered charity in 1995.

There are 9 trustees, assisted by several co-opted managers, who divide their time between raising awareness of the project among Rotarians in RIBI, identifying appropriate sites for projects, principally in India and Africa, and assisting in the preparation of programmes, budgets and financing for those projects.

The bulk of their work in India revolves around Limb camps, with as many as 3000 patients turning up for help, but in Africa and other countries outside India they establish new permanent centres and provide on-going support for them by way of technician training, materials and equipment.

What is the Jaipur Limb?

It is an artificial leg, developed at the Mahaveer hospital in Jaipur, India. The unique component is the Jaipur foot, a clever combination of wood and various densities of rubber vulcanised into a realistic looking brown foot.

The Jaipur limb is hard-wearing and will last for three or four years, longer if worn with a shoe.

One of the major differences between the Jaipur technology and western technology is the cost – whereas a western limb will cost between £1,000.00 and £2,000.00, a Jaipur limb can be made and fitted for as little as £30.00.

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